omslag Krutak_18 mm

Tattoo Traditions of Native North America


* The ONLY place to purchase a SIGNED copy from LARS KRUTAK! – USA orders ONLY or contact me for International orders

This book is out of stock but available through University of Washington Press and Amazon.

  • 256 pages
  • 11 x 8.5 inches (large format)
  • Illustrated with more than 500 color and black and white images
  • First book to examine the Indigenous tattoo history of the entire North American continent
  • Chapters: Arctic & Subarctic, Northwest Coast & Plateau, California & Southwest, Great Plains, and
    Eastern Woodlands
  • Designs from around Native North America offer tattoo enthusiasts many new ideas
  • Fully referenced and indexed
  • Hard Cover Bound
  • 3.5 pounds weight
  • ISBN 9789491394096
  • LM Publishers (published June 16, 2014)


For thousands of years astonishingly rich and diverse forms of tattooing have been produced by the Indigenous peoples of North America. Long neglected by anthropologists and art historians, tattooing was a time-honoured traditional practice that expressed the patterns of tribal social organization and religion, while also channelling worlds inhabited by deities, spirits, and the ancestors. TATTOO TRADITIONS OF NATIVE NORTH AMERICA explores the many facets of indelible Indigenous body marking across every cultural region of North America. As the first book on the subject, it breaks new ground on one of the least-known mediums of Amerindian expressive culture that nearly disappeared from view in the twentieth century, until it was reborn in recent decades. Text in English.

* Shipping to USA addresses only.
* To view images in the book, please click here.

Books also available through University of Washington Press and Amazon.

For the 2015 book review in “News From Native California” click HERE!

“Tattoo Traditions of Native North America begins to fill the void in the global record of traditional tattooing practices. . . . This volume provides a depth of cultural understanding rarely seen in conversations about tattooing in North America.”

-Rhonda Dass, Anthropos (2015)